UTSOA

The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture

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exhibits archive

Ideas In and Out of Place: Architecture in Brazil, 1930-2010

Copan Building, Oscar Niemeyer, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1945

September 17, 2012 to August 16, 2013

Exhibit Opening: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2012 from 2-4 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Images are on display through August 16, 2013 in Battle Hall 

The images in this exhibit were contributed to the Visual Resources Collection by Community and Regional Planning Ph.D. student Kristine Stiphany.

"The images explore the adaptation of modernist architecture to the socio-technical and biophysical conditions of the contemporary Brazilian city.  Since the 1920s, a diverse set of actors—architects, engineers, and builders—have developed new approaches to a largely Eurocentric architecture, resulting in points of contact and divergence.  The resulting hybrids challenge the contextual independence inherent in high modernist architecture and introduce strategies of environmental management, citizen involvement, public education, and integration of materials and methods endemic to Brazilian building culture." --Kristine Stiphany

View the online archive of the exhibit.

View exhibit images on Flickr.

Visual Transpositions: A Photographic Dialog Between Austin Past and Present

Congress Avenue, Austin, TX. June Jung, 2013.

February 18, 2013 to August 16, 2013

Exhibit Opening: 
Thursday, February 28, 2013 from 2-4 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

The images in this exhibit highlight Austin's Congress Avenue, with streetscapes captured in the 1950s and 60s alongside scenes of Congress and its environs as they stand today. The exhibit's historical images are available from the Texas Architecture: A Visual History Website and the VRC's Online Image Collection. Contemporary images were shot by VRC staff members and developed and printed in the UTSOA Darkroom, a resource managed by the VRC and available to all currently enrolled UTSOA students.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Illuminating Atmosphere and Materiality: Photographs by Wilfried Wang

St. Benedict Chapel, Sumvitg, Switzerland.
Peter Zumthor, 1987-1989.

September 13, 2011 to August 10, 2012

Exhibit Opening: 
Thursday, September 22, 2011 from 2-4 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Images are on display through August 10, 2012 in Battle Hall 

Over two decades, Professor Wilfried Wang took thousands of slides with the robust single lens reflex camera (Leica SL2 either with the Zeiss Biogon 21mm wide angle lens or with the Vario-Elmar 14-50mm lens). Over the past few years, Professor Wang has been systematically donating his collection to the School of Architecture (SoA) Visual Resources Collection (VRC). The VRC has in turn been digitizing and cataloging the slides so that digital versions are available to SoA faculty and students to support teaching and research. The images on display in this exhibit include general and detailed views that capture atmosphere and the materiality of the built environment. 

The VRC has partnered with ARTstor, a licensed image resource that includes over 1 million images supporting study in the humanities and social sciences, to make accessible Professor Wang's images of modern European and American architecture, with a special focus on museum architecture.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

View exhibit images on Flickr.

Afterimage: Black and White Visions

photograph by Shelley Evans

February 17, 2012 to August 10, 2012

Exhibit Opening:
Tuesday, February 28, 2012, from 2-4 pm
Visual Resource Collection, Sutton 3.128

Students in Professor Judy Birdsong’s fall 2011 Vertical Studio took the images displayed in the Visual Resources Collection’s (VRC) spring-summer 2012 exhibit. Students designed and constructed their own pinhole cameras, and using either film negatives or silver-gelatin print paper, took photographs that they developed and printed in the School of Architecture Darkroom, a facility managed by the VRC.

Professor Birdsong notes that “The mechanism by which a pinhole camera operates is so rudimentary that its construction lends itself easily to modification and invention, as evidenced by the wide range of examples also included in this exhibit...Underscoring recurring themes of time and memory represented here, the imprecise nature of the pinhole can also lend a hazy quality to the photographs sympathetic to the elusive and incomplete images in our mind’s eye; and reinforces again the inevitable bond between medium and message.”

 

View the online archive of the exhibit.

View exhibit images on Flickr.

Capturing Light and Time: Pinhole Cameras and Photographs

Untitled, 2010. Photography by Lyndi Vaughan.

February 14, 2011 to August 12, 2011

Exhibit opening:
Tuesday, February 22, 2011 from 2-4 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

The cameras and photographs on display represent work produced in the fall of 2010 by fifth semester architecture students in Professor Judy Birdsong's topic-based design studio organized around the theme oflight and time in architecture. As a means of introducing students to fundamental principles of light, students constructed a pinhole camera, essentially a simple box with a single small aperture that employs the same optical principles as the camera obscura. Despite the simple program and inflexible constraints, the result was an array of inventine (and occassionally decorative) products that ranged from straightforward, but beautifully designed shells, to those that allowed for multiple views, multiple exposures, and interchangable focal lengths. The photographs chronicle the efforts of students to record the passage of time through the agency of light, the assigned subject of the second exercise of the semester. 

The students produced their photographs in the School of Architecture (SoA) Photo Union. The Architecture Photo Union, a club established by student Craig Kennedy, began in October 1969. The SoA provided the Photo Union with space in Goldsmith Hall for the darkroom, which included enlargers and a sink, where students could develop and print black and white films. Mike Farmer, the SoA staff sponsor at the time, helped design the space in Sutton 1.104, which became the Photo Union's home in 1982. As of the fall of 2011, the Photo Union will move from Sutton 1.104 into Sutton 1.108, cease to be recognized as a student club and remain part of the suite of services managed by the Visual Resources Collection. While the facility will be significantly smaller, it will still accommodate black and white film development and printing. After undergoing renovation, Sutton 1.104 will house laser cutters, an equipment resource critical to the SoA community. 

View the online archive of the exhibit.

View exhibit images on Flickr.

Reflecting the Collective Gaze: Images from the Visual Resources Collection

Forum 2004 Esplanade and Photovoltaic Plant, Barcelona, Spain.
Photograph by Jason Sowell.

September 13, 2010 to January 14, 2011

Visual Resources Collection, Sutton Hall 3.128 and Battle Hall, ground floor hallway

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, October 18, 2010 from 3-5 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Established in the mid-1960s, the School of Architecture's Visual Resources Collection (VRC) serves as a repository for images that reflect the collective gaze of generations of faculty members and students. This visual record is a resource for professors and students influencing future architects, planners, preservationists, critics, interior designers, landscape architects and historians.

In celebration of the School of Architecture’s centennial, this exhibit highlights a selection of images donated by faculty, students and alumni. Currently the VRC’s growing collection numbers over 100,000 digital images and 250,000 35mm slides. The university community can access the image collection online.

 

View the online archive of the exhibit.

View exhibit images on Flickr.

Rigorous Vision: Capturing Contemporary Architecture, Photographs by Larry Speck

Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Yoshio Taniguchi, Toyota, Japan, 1995

February 4, 2010 to August 13, 2010

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, February 4, 2010 from 3-5 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

The photographs in the exhibit, Rigorous Visions: Capturing Contemporary Architecture, represent a small subset of the thousands of images that Professor Lawrence Speck has contributed to the School of Architecture's Visual Resources Collection.

Either on the fly, or as part of a pilgrimage with a planned itinerary, Speck has captured the formal qualities of contemporary public space in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He is " . . . particularly attracted to buildings of our time and to public buildings that embody the character and aspirations of a particular institution or culture."

View the online archive of the exhibit.

The Passage to the New: Modern Architecture in Central Europe, 1890-1938, Photographs by Christopher Long

Hodek Apartment Building, architect Josef Chochol, Prague,
Czech Republic, 1913-1914

September 17, 2009 to January 15, 2010

Exhibit Opening: 
Thursday, September 17, 2009 from 3-5 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

During the mid 1980s, Christopher Long,  professor for Architectural History at The University of Texas at Austin, photographed the built environment in Central and Eastern Europe. Awarded a Fulbright to study at the University of Vienna, Long researched his dissertation on the life and work of architect and designer Josef Frank.

Long, trained as a cultural history, began a self-taught crash course in architectural history. He walked the streets of Vienna, Hungary and Poland. He visited and observed every Frank building and photographed other examples of Viennese modernism, including buildings by Otto Wagner, Josef Hoffman, Joseph Maria Olbrich, and Adolf Loos. He photographed during the cold winter months when light was clearest in order to overcome Austria's overcast weather and to capture building facades often veiled in the shadows of their neighbors.

From 1994-1996, Professor Long lived and taught in Prague. He shot images of a city in transition being rebuilt after the fall of communism. 

The Visual Resources Collection (VRC) collaborated with ARTstor, a digital library of over one million images licensed by The University of Texas Libraries, to catalog and digitize over two hundred of Professor Long's slides. The exhibit represents a selection of images from ARTstor's Christopher Long: Central European Architecture collection.


 

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Perceiving Space : The Hal Box and Logan Wagner Collection of Mexican Architecture and Urban Design

Cuilapan Monastery, Oaxaca, Mexico, 16th Century

February 4, 2009 to August 14, 2009

Exhibit Opening: 
Thursday, February 5, 2009 from 3-5 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

 Every summer from 1985 to 1996, with the assistance of volunteer teams from Earthwatch,  W.L. Moody, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus in Architecture and former dean of the School of Architecture Hal Box, F.A.I.A., and Dr. Logan Wagner explored, photographed, measured and made scale drawings of over ninety town in Mexico; the collection of over 8,000 slides taken during this period was donated to the School of Architecture’s Visual Resources Collection (VRC).

The exhibit Perceiving Space: The Hal Box and Logan Wagner Collection of Mexican Architecture and Urban Design highlights a selection of images from a collection that documents communal open spaces built in Mexico from 2000 BC to the present, concentrating on the 16th and 17th century fusion of Mesoamerican and European architecture and town planning.  Contained in the collection are images of sacred open spaces formed by ancient pyramids and the plazas, atrios, cloisters and towns' central plazas.

In 2006 the VRC and ARTstor, a digital library of nearly one million images, agreed to collaborate on a project to digitize and distribute images from the collection through the ARTstor Digital Library.  With generous support from ARTstor, graduate student Kristina Kupferschmid cataloged and selected almost 6,000 images for digitization from January 2007 through September 2008. The Hal Box and Logan Wagner Collection of Mexican Architecture and Urban Design will be available in ARTstor in spring 2009 and as part of the VRC's online Image Collection.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Architecture in Mongolia Through the Ages

Yampai (a wall) before south gate at the Amarbayasgalant Monastery
in Selenge (Michael Bricker)

September 15, 2008 to January 16, 2009

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, September 18, 2008 from 3-5 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

In 2006, graduate student Michael Bricker received the School of Architecture’s (SOA) Mebane Travel Grant to visit Mongolia to design an energy efficient home for a family in the community of Yeroo.  Upon receiving funding from the SOA, Michael invited graduate student Ami Mehta to assist with the research and design of the proposed home. Together, Michael and Ami decided to expand the scope of the project to include two independent study courses to research Mongolian architectural history—namely the ger, Chinese Buddhist temples, and Soviet civic buildings—and to investigate the architectural consequences of a newly democratic, modern Mongolia. During their stay in Mongolia, Michael, Ami and Jacob Knight, a colleague working in the Peace Corps in Mongolia, documented the built environment and have contributed almost four hundred digital images, along with descriptive metadata, to the SOA Visual Resources Collection (VRC).  The images in this exhibit represent a small sampling of images selected from the group that are available for use by the university community as part of the VRC's online Image Collection.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Landscape Architecture’s History: Marrying Research and Teaching through the Camera’s Eye

Donnell Garden, Sonoma, California. Photo by Mirka Beneš.

February 1, 2008 to August 15, 2008

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, February 14, 2008 from 3-5 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

During the course of her academic career, Professor Mirka Beneš has documented a wide range of landscapes and supporting materials such as rare prints, maps, drawings, and written documents. From Professor Beneš’s extensive slide collection, a group of almost 8,000 teaching slides—used in support of her two lecture courses in the history and theories of landscape architecture—were selected and, over the past 16 months, in collaboration with Professor Beneš, the slides have been cataloged and digitized by the School of Architecture’s Visual Resources Collection (VRC). The selection of images in this exhibit represent a small sampling of images selected from the group of almost 8,000 that are, due to the generosity of Professor Beneš, available for use by the university community as part of the VRC’s online Image Collection.


Mirka Beneš is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture, The University of Texas at Austin, which she joined in 2006. Her teaching covers the whole history of landscape architecture and gardens, and she publishes on Baroque Rome, Italian and French gardens, agrarian landscapes, and modernist landscape architecture. From 1988 to 2005, she taught at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, latterly as Associate Professor.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Images of India : Photography by Sarah Hill

Carrier Pigeon Cages, City Palace and Museum,
Udaipur, Rajasthan, 16th-18th century.

August 31, 2007 to January 7, 2008

Exhibit Opening: 
Thursday, September 27, 2007 from 3-5 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Traveling throughout India for six weeks in summer 2006 with the Advanced Travel India Studio led by Lecturers Pankaj Gupta and Christine Mueller, Sarah Hill was provided with many opportunities to document the visually rich environment. The selection of images in this exhibit represents a small sampling of over 3700 digital images that are now part of the School of Architecture's Visual Resources Image Collection; the images will be available shortly for use by the University community for study, teaching, and research.

This project was supported in great part by a ~FAST Tex Grant from the University's Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Frozen Notes : The Photography of Frederick R. Steiner

Rome, Italy, June 2000

January 24, 2007 to August 24, 2007

Exhibit Opening: 
Monday, February 12, 2007 from 3-5 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

This exhibit features a selection of black and white photographs printed from 35mm Scala slides taken by the School of Architecture's Dean Frederick Steiner.

Regarding his photographic pursuits, Dean Steiner says, "I seldom think about taking pictures, it is something I just do. Through my camera, I am an observer of the contemporary urban condition. Mostly, I take pictures of buildings and landscapes. I suppose my pictures might be viewed as abbreviated forms of architecture."

Dean Steiner is the Henry M. Rockwell Chair in Architecture, University of Texas at Austin. During his tenure as a National Endowment for the Arts Prize Fellow in Rome in 1998, his love for photography was rekindled and he has been photographing ever since.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Through the Eyes of an Architect: Images from R. James Coote's Travels

Temple of the Four Winds at Castle Howard, Yorkshire, England

September 8, 2006 to January 12, 2007

Exhibit Opening:
Friday, September 15, 2006 from 3-5 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Our current exhibit features digital prints from selected 35mm slides donated to the Visual Resources Collection (VRC) by Professor Emeritus R. James Coote. Along with almost two thousand slides from his personal collection, Professor Coote provided thorough descriptions of each image facilitating the creation of online catalog records; the entire donation is in the process of being digitized and will be available online for use by the University community.

From 1965-2000, Professor Emeritus Coote taught architectural design and architectural history courses to undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas at Austin.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Into The Light: A Sampler of Alternative Photographic Processes

cyanotype print by Anthony Maddaloni

February 1, 2006 to August 1, 2006

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, February 16, 2006 from 4-6 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

In this age of digital perfection, there is a growing body of artists returning to historical methods to hand-craft photographic images. Alternative photographic processes result in unique images; no two prints can ever be exactly alike. In this exhibit, three distinctly different processes are on view: pinhole prints and cameras, cyanotype prints, and polaroid manipulations.

The pinhole cameras were made by students of Lecturer Russell Krepart in conjunction with his vertical studio class in Fall 2005. All the prints were produced in the School of Architecture's Photo Union Darkroom. Darkoom membership is available to all currently enrolled architecture school students for a nominal fee. Membership includes free workshops covering such topics as Cyanotype, Polaroid transfer, and basic black and white printing.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Texas Architecture: A Visual History

Commercial buildings on 6th Street, Austin, Texas. Photograph by D. Blake Alexander.

October 1, 2005 to January 1, 2006

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, September 22, 2005 from 4-6 pm
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128  

Texas Architecture: A Visual History showcases images selected from the D. Blake Alexander and Marian Davis slide collections held by the University of Texas Libraries Alexander Architectural Archive and the Visual Resources Collection (VRC), respectively. The collections are unique and valuable resources documenting architecture throughout Texas of both extant and razed buildings. The exhibit highlights turn-of-the-century commercial architecture on Congress Avenue and 6th Street with images taken in Austin in the late 1950s by the late Professor Davis, as well as images taken around Texas by Professor Emeritus D. Blake Alexander.

The VRC's exhibit complements the online exhibit by the same name funded by The University of Texas at Austin's UTOPIA initiative. UTOPIA projects are designed to open the University's doors of knowledge, research, and information to the public. The online exhibit provides an historical overview of the development of the built environment in Texas in addition to providing access to 3,971 digitized images documenting Texas architecture. Visit the online version of Texas Architecture: A Visual History.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

Lensless Photography: The Art of the Pinhole

photo by Sarah Hill

January 1, 2005 to August 1, 2005

Exhibit Opening:
Thursday, January 27, 2005 from 4-6 pm 
Visual Resources Collection, Sutton 3.128 

Lensless Photography: The Art of the Pinhole showcases black and white pinhole photographs taken by students in Lecturer Russell Krepart's fall 2004 Vertical Studio. Various locations, from sites in Marfa, Texas, to a bathroom in Sutton Hall provided a variety of lighting conditions challenging the students to experiment with pinhole technology and film exposure times. The photos were printed in the School of Architecture's Photo Union Darkroom by class participants. The pinhole cameras constructed by the students are also displayed.

View the online archive of the exhibit.

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